Survey shows increase across country in family and whānau involvement in patient care

12 Nov 2018 | Health Quality Intelligence

The latest inpatient survey shows a significant increase in the number of patients who felt hospital staff included their family and whānau in discussions about their care.

The finding comes from the third quarter (August 2018) results of the patient experience survey, coordinated by the Health Quality & Safety Commission. The survey runs quarterly in all district health boards and covers four key domains of patient experience: communication, partnership, co-ordination and physical and emotional needs.

Director Health Quality Intelligence Richard Hamblin says the percentage of those surveyed who positively answered the question ‘Did the hospital staff include your family/whānau or someone close to you in discussions about your care?’ had a statistically significant increase from 55 to 58 percent.

‘Fifteen of the 20 DHBs showed this shift, which indicates that change has been widespread.’

Dr Chris Walsh, the Commission’s Director Consumer Engagement says the findings are very pleasing, particularly since this area has been one of the lower scoring ones since the start of the survey.

‘Family and whānau are often the key support people and including them in discussions about treatment and care is critical to improving health outcomes.’

View the survey results.

Last updated 12/11/2018