Update on the safe use of opioids collaborative

5 Sep 2014 | Medication Safety

An update from the Health Quality & Safety Commission's Medication Safety programme on the safe use of opioids collaborative. In this update:

National collaborative team

The Medication Safety programme welcomes the members of the national safe use of opioids collaborative:

  • Avril Lee, Clinical Lead (on secondment from Waitemata DHB)
  • John Kristiansen, Project Manager
  • Prem Kumar, Quality Improvement Advisor.

The Commission is excited to have such a high caliber team to support and lead this work.

The expert faculty for the national collaborative is scheduled to meet in late September and again in early October. The faculty will review and discuss current evidence and guide the development of interventions and measures for quality improvement. Faculty members include palliative care specialists, pain practitioners, anaesthetists, medication safety and quality improvement specialists.

Regional Learning Session Zero workshop dates are being confirmed for late October/early November. The National Collaborative team is looking forward to meeting all DHB collaborative team members.

Please remember to register your team at: http://www.hqsc.govt.nz/our-programmes/medication-safety/opioid-collaborative-registration-form.

New video resource – the value of a collaborative

In this new video, Commission Senior Portfolio Manager, Carmela Petagna and Dr Shawn Sturland who was national clinical lead for the CLAB collaborative, discuss the importance of working together to improve best practice in the safe use of opioids. Shawn shares his experience of leading and participating in the CLAB collaborative and talks about the value of being engaged and participating in the collaborative from the outset: http://www.hqsc.govt.nz/our-programmes/medication-safety/publications-and-resources/publication/1755/.

Related article on oxycodone

A recent BPAC article (July 2014 edition) “How did we get here and how do we fix it” provides commentary on high-risk medicines focusing on increasing volumes in oxycodone prescribing. It is a thought provoking read and makes positive links to the Medication Safety programme’s focus on the safe use of opioids in hospital settings.

Visit the Open for better care website for an update on the high-risk medicine campaign focus.

Last updated 05/09/2014