As part of the national advance care planning programme[1], district health boards (DHBs) agreed to fund national clinical communication training to increase the clinical communication capability of their staff.

The first new component of the clinical communication training is the serious illness conversation guide. The guide was developed by American non-profit organisation Ariadne Labs[2] with Atul Gawande, following the publication of his book Being Mortal. The guide is a tool to support health care professionals who feel ill-equipped to have conversations with seriously ill people about what they want when their lives may be limited.

A core team of six clinicians with substantial clinical communication expertise and experience will support the implementation of the serious illness conversation guide in New Zealand. Below a short bio for the six national trainers.

National serious illness conversation guide train-the-trainers

Emma MerryEmma Merry

Emma lives in the Hawke’s Bay and is a palliative medicine specialist (previously specialist intensivist), clinical education advisor at the University of Otago and a senior medical officer for Organ Donation New Zealand. Emma is also on the national patient deterioration expert advisory group and is a contractor with Connect Communications, facilitating Medical Council training workshops.


Jane GoodwinJane Goodwin

Jane lives in Christchurch and is the Canterbury DHB ACP facilitator, Chair of the national ACP steering group She is a level three advanced communication trainer and level four national advanced communication train-the-trainer with the ACP programme.


Lynn TwigleyLynn Twigley

Lynn lives in the Hawke’s Bay and is the palliative medicine officer (previously GP), honorary clinical lecturer at the University of Otago and a level three advanced communication trainer.


Prue McCallumPrue McCallum

Prue lives in Tauranga and is a palliative medicine specialist (previously GP), regional/rural coordinator in the Bay of Plenty, honorary senior lecturer at the University of Auckland, Vital Talk Communication faculty member and a level three advanced communication trainer.


Carla ArklessCarla Arkless

Carla lives in Nelson and is a palliative care nurse practitioner, level three advanced communication trainer and level four national advanced communication train-the-trainer with the ACP programme. Carla is also a member of the national ACP steering group.


Oleg KirieavOleg Kirieav

Oleg lives in Auckland and is a palliative care consultant and geriatrician, professional teaching fellow at the University of Auckland and a level three advanced communication trainer.


References:

  1. The ACP programme is managed by the Health Quality & Safety Commission. The 2019–22 training strategy is available on our website.

  2. More information can be found at www.ariadnelabs.org.

 

Last updated 17/08/2018