The Dame Kate Harcourt story book and photo album is a resource for use by providers in their falls prevention programmes.

Dame Kate had a fall in late 2013 and her story (in short and long versions) tells about her injuries and the impacts on her life while recovering. Experiencing a fall prompted new awareness of preventing falls at home for Dame Kate and her family – demonstrating a positive and resilient response to the possibility of falling.

The story book and photo album document (downloadable below) is in Word format. It contains key messages about falls prevention at home, Dame Kate’s story, and a set of photographs grouped in themes and matched with falls messages and suggested captions.

Please use the high resolution photographs displayed in the web page below. No permissions are needed, but an acknowledgement should be made to the Health Quality & Safety Commission.

We would like to thank Dame Kate for her willingness to be ‘a famous face for falls’, and also Gillian Watson (physiotherapist for older adults, Capital & Coast District Health Board) who appears in some of the photographs.

Dame Kate story book cover

Download the Dame Kate story book and photo album

 

 

 

 

 

Dame Kate Harcourt photo album 

Please use the links below to access the Dame Kate Harcourt high resolution images.

General portraits 

Image Falls message Possible captions/text Use with
Click for high res   Dame Kate Harcourt had a fall at home, fracturing her wrist. She has agreed to be the ‘face’ of the Health Quality & Safety Commission’s national falls programme.

“I know I’m jolly lucky my fall wasn’t a lot worse, but it has still had a big effect on my life,” says Dame Kate. “I think it’s important for everyone to work together to do everything possible to prevent falls.”
General falls prevention communications
 Click for high res   Dame Kate Harcourt has agreed to be the ‘face’ of the Commission’s national falls programme.  She had a fall at home, fracturing her wrist.

Any fall, with or without injury, is a reason to implement an individualised plan of care that addresses an older person’s risk factors for falling.

In particular, a fracture in an older person should prompt assessment of bone health for risk of osteoporosis.

(See below for a note about fractures related to osteoporosis).
General falls prevention communications
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Brief note about osteoporosis and risk of fragility fracture

Fractures in both women and men aged 50 years and over should be considered fragility fractures until osteoporosis is ruled out[1]. Individuals who suffer a first fragility fracture are at double the risk of future fractures compared with those who have never broken a bone[2], and at least half of those who break their hip have suffered a prior fragility fracture[3,4].

Preventing falls and protecting independence 

Image Falls message Possible caption/s Use with
Click for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. Older people (or their families and caregivers) can go online to learn about falls.  Dame Kate has opened ACC’s booklet ‘Standing up to falls’ (ACC 2383 Standing up to falls).  Find the booklet and other resources at www.acc.co.nz/older-people. Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. ACC’s booklet ‘Standing up to falls: your guide to preventing falls and protecting your independence’ is a good resource (ACC 2383 Standing up to falls). Ask, assess, act project

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Click here for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. Advice about falls prevention from health professionals has credibility – family members and caregivers can also follow and reinforce these messages.
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ACC’s booklet ‘Standing up to falls: your guide to preventing falls and protecting your independence’ is a good resource (ACC 2383 Standing up to falls).
Ask, assess, act project

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Click here for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. Genuine concern helps establish rapport and trust for a positive conversation about preventing falls and protecting an older person’s independence. Ask, assess, act project

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Exercise for balance and strength 

Image Falls message Possible caption/s Use with
Click for high res Balance and strength exercises can be done at home. Dame Kate looks at a balance and strength exercise leaflet with Gillian Watson, physiotherapist for older adults, Capital & Coast District Board (DHB). Ask, assess, act project

Topic 9
Click for high res Balance and strength exercises can be done at home. Dame Kate is using the kitchen bench for support in these exercises.
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Gillian Watson encourages Dame Kate to maintaining good posture while exercising – “Think of a plumb line”.
Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Balance and strength exercises can be done at home. The single leg stand exercise is very effective for improving balance. Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Balance and strength exercises can be done at home. Dame Kate on tip toes (the calf raise exercise), which helps balance and lower limb strength. Ask, assess, act project

Topic 9
Click for high res Balance and strength exercises can be done at home. Gillian Watson says: “Lots of people find it hard to get out of a low chair. Lean forward and use your hands to push forward.”

(However, if an older person cannot get out of a dining chair without using their hands, then they have a high fall risk because of poor lower limb strength.  Using a dining chair for the ‘sit-to-stand’ exercise is good for balance and lower limb strength.)
Ask, assess, act project

Topic 9
Click for high res Keeping active and enjoying the outdoors is important. Enjoying the sunshine outdoors also helps vitamin D levels.
  • From September to April, take a walk or do outside activities in the early morning or late afternoon. Remember to be SunSmart through the middle of the day.
  • From May to August, take a walk or do outside activities in the middle of the day, with your face, arms and hands uncovered.
Topic 9 (also see section on Vitamin D)
Click for high res Keeping active and enjoying the outdoors is important. Keeping active and enjoying the outdoors is important.
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Gillian Watson says, “Pick an activity you enjoy for your exercise routine, such as walking outdoors”.
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Click for high res Keeping active and enjoying the outdoors is important. Gillian Watson says: “Walking on a slightly uneven surface such grass is a good challenge for your balance – use it or lose it!” Topic 9
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Prescribed Vitamin D 

Image Falls message Possible caption/s Use with
Click for high res Prescribed vitamin D is widely recommended around the world for preventing falls in older people at higher risk of falling. Dame Kate with ACC’s card: ‘Vitamin D: is it right for you? Ask your GP’.
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Vitamin D: is it right for you? Ask your GP.
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Ask your GP about vitamin D.
Prescribed vitamin D initiatives

Topic 7
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Click for high res Your doctor may suggest that you spend more time in the sun to increase your vitamin D. From September to April, take a walk or do outside activities in the early morning or late afternoon. Remember to be SunSmart through the middle of the day.

From May to August, take a walk or do outside activities in the middle of the day, with your face, arms and hands uncovered.
Prescribed vitamin D initiatives

Topic 7
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Ensure appropriate footwear 

Image Falls message Possible caption/s Use with
Click for high res Ensure older people wear well-fitting, flat shoes with non-slip soles for increased stability. Gillian Watson says: “This shoe ticks all the boxes: it’s fitted around the heel with straps over the top and it has a medium weight flexible sole.” Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Ensure older people wear well-fitting, flat shoes with non-slip soles for increased stability. Dame Kate likes the velcro straps on this shoe – it makes it easy to get them on and off, and easy to adjust if your feet swell. Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Ensure older people wear well-fitting, flat shoes with non-slip soles for increased stability. Gillian Watson says: “Slippers like this aren’t so good. Avoid loose-fitting, slip-on styles. They change how you walk - you’re ‘scuffing to keep them on, and it’s easy to trip”. Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Ensure older people wear well-fitting, flat shoes with non-slip soles for increased stability. Gillian Watson says: “A low heel is best, but a modest heel like this could be worn on special occasions.” Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Ensure older people wear well-fitting, flat shoes with non-slip soles for increased stability. Safety and style - you can have a good range of nice, lightweight shoes that support your feet and help you walk safely. Ask, assess, act project

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Optimise vision 

Image Falls message Possible caption/s Use with
Click for high res Optimise older people’s vision to reduce their risk of falling. Many falls are caused by wearing bi-focals or reading glasses outdoors. Advise older people to use their reading glasses only for reading, and to ask their optician for single lens glasses to wear when active outside. Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Optimise older people’s vision to reduce their risk of falling. Ask older people: “When did you last have your eyes tested?”.
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Advise older people: “Wear your reading glasses only for reading. Ask your optician for single lens glasses for when you are out and about”.
Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Optimise older people’s vision to reduce their risk of falling. “Keep your glasses clean.” Ask, assess, act project

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Click for high res Optimise older people’s vision to reduce their risk of falling. Advise older people to take extra care until they are used to their new glasses. Ask, assess, act project

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Home safety 

Image Falls message Possible caption/s Use with
Click for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. Dame Kate works through the ACC home safety checklist
(ACC5128 How safe is your home?)
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Complete the ACC home safety checklist – as it says, “You may know your home like the back of your hand, but the things you see every day could be potential hazards that can lead to a fall”. (ACC5128 How safe is your home?)
Topic 4
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Click for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. Do your rugs lie flat, without frayed corners or rolled up edges? Topic 4
Click for high res The risk of falling does increase with age, but the good news is, you can do something about it. Dame Kate takes up a rug that could cause a trip or fall.
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Remove rugs that could cause a trip or fall.
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References:

  1.  Eisman JA, Bogoch ER, Dell R et al. 2012. Making the first fracture the last fracture: ASBMR task force report on secondary fracture prevention. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 27(10): 2039–46.
  2.  Kanis JA, Johnell O, De Laet C et al. 2004. A meta-analysis of previous fracture and subsequent fracture risk. Bone 35(2): 375–82.
  3.  Gallagher JC, Melton LJ, Riggs BL et al. 1980. Epidemiology of fractures of the proximal femur in Rochester, Minnesota. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 150: 163–71.
  4.  Port L, Center J, Briffa NK et al. 2003. Osteoporotic fracture: missed opportunity for intervention. Osteoporosis International 14(9): 780–4.

Last updated 13/10/2016